Backyard Wildlife Habitat

Native Missouri Orchids

Picture Gallery

 

Most of the orchids in this gallery have been seen in Jackson County.  Most of Missouri’s orchid species are on the rare and endangered checklist, mainly due to habitat destruction.  If you are lucky enough to find orchids growing in the wild, admire them and leave them alone for others to enjoy as well.  Check with Grow Native for sources of orchid plants and orchid seeds.

Large Yellow Lady-slipper (Cypripedium calceolus var pubescens); Photo from Missouri State Herbarium

Large Yellow Lady-slipper (Cypripedium calceolus var pubescens); Photo from www.usplants.com website.

Large Yellow Lady-slipper (Cypripedium calceolus var pubescens); Photo from www.botany.wisconsin.com

Large Yellow Lady-slipper (Cypripedium calceolus var pubescens); Photo fom www.botany.wisconsin.com

Lesser Yellow Lady-slipper (Cypripedium calceolus var parviflorum); Photo from Missouri State Herbarium

Lesser Yellow Lady-slipper (Cypripedium calceolus var parviflorum); Photo from Ball State University

Showy orchis(Galearis spectabilis); Photo from www.usplants.com website

Western prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera praeclara); Photo from Missouri Department of Conservation

Three-bird orchid (Triphora trianthophora); Photo Oklahoma Biosurvey

Slender ladies' tresses (Spiranthes lacera); Photo from University of Texas

Vernal ladies' tresses (Spiranthes vernalis); Photo from Missouri State Herbarium

Nodding ladies' tresses (Spiranthes cernua); Photo from Missouri State Herbarium

Rattlesnake plantain (Goodyera pubescens); Photo from Missouri State Herbarium

Adam and Eve Orchid (Aplectrum hyemale); Photo from University of North Carolina

Cranefly orchid (Tipularia discolor); Photo from University of North Carolina

Cranefly orchid (Tipularia discolor); Photo from University of North Carolina